Poster: Culturally-Responsive Social-Emotional Learning to Address the Gap of School Dropout and Gang-Related Among First Immigrant Latino Youth Students

Culturally-Responsive Social-Emotional Learning to Address the Gap of School Dropout and Gang-Related Among First Immigrant Latino Youth Students

Asif Ashiqali, M.A., Rocio Gomez, M.A., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Youths are the leaders of tomorrow. Per the Pew Hispanic Center (2016), Latino Youths (LYs) have been the fastest growing minority population in the U.S. Meta-analysis shows that LYs have the largest percentage of high school dropouts compared to mainstream youths, and they are likely knowledgeable or/and gang affiliated. Particularly, first immigrant youth Latinos students (FIYLS) face more problems within schools than previous generations because of adaptation to host society cultural norms. Considering the number of LYs in the school system and their adversity to graduate, the need to understand and protect this population seems urgent. The main purpose of this literature review is to bridge the gap of FILYS challenges by informing culturally-adapted Social Emotional Learning theory (SEL). Research demonstrates that SEL correlates with such positive outcomes as academic success, decrease of peer conflict, and promotion of positive youth development.

Keywords: Latino students, dropout, gang related, socio-emotional learning, culturally-responsive