Poster: Exploring Prejudice and Discrimination Toward Muslims in a Post-9/11 Era: Sources, Outcomes, Coping Strategies and Clinical Implications

Exploring Prejudice and Discrimination Toward Muslims in a Post-9/11 Era: Sources, Outcomes, Coping Strategies and Clinical Implications

Jamie Tolmatsky, MA, Mandi Ginsburg, MA, Adler University

The study of prejudice towards Muslims continues to be a relevant area of investigation, especially in light of the current political climate where anti-Muslim rhetoric has gained a more prominent, and perhaps socially acceptable, platform (Rodriguez Mosquera, Khan, & Selya, 2013). Numerous studies conducted since 9/11 elucidates both implicit and explicit prejudice towards Muslims (Brown et al., 2013; Park, Felix, & Lee, 2007). These studies point to salient cues such as dress, name, complexion, accent, and other variables that contribute to negative evaluations (Rodriguez Mosquera et al., 2013; Shaver, Troughton, Sibley, & Bulbulia, 2015). In an effort to cope with the distress of anti-Muslim sentiment, individuals tend to cope in several ineffective ways, including rumination, avoidance of public spaces, and religious coping (Rodriguez Mosquera et al., 2013). The goal of this poster is to dispense a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of prejudice affecting Muslim clients as well as the problematic coping techniques these clients may employ.

Keywords: prejudice, discrimination, Islam, Arab-Americans